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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRAHY ~ ^ 

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3 9999 06544 682 3 



No. 98 



Sip (Etftttmnttuttalilj at MuBmd}i\BtttB 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



DIRECTOR OF 
LIVESTOCK DISEASE CONTROL 



FOR THE 



Year ending, November 30, 1937 




Publication of this Document Approved by the Commission ox Administration and Finance 
700. 4-'38. Order 3678 



Sljr (Uttmmxxnmtulil) at iKaaaarljuH^ttii 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

DIVISION OF LIVESTOCK DISEASE CONTROL 

To the Commissioner of Agriculture : 

The report of the Division of Livestock Disease Control for the year ending 
November 30, 1937, is presented herewith. 

The work of this division in the prevention, suppression, and extirpation of 
contagious diseases of domestic animals has progressed most satisfactorily. Dur- 
ing the entire year there has been no serious outbreak of any of the diseases of 
animals over which the division has jurisdiction. 

A reduction, although slight, in the total number of reactors to the tuberculin 
test from the total for the previous year is worthy of note and can be considered 
as strengthening the rating of the State as a modified accredited bovine tubercu- 
losis-free area. 

The prevalence of rabies continues to be a matter of great concern. The prob- 
lem of control demands far more consideration and attention than are now given 
by town, city, and county authorities. Particularly is this true in regard to the 
enforcement of laws concerning the licensing of dogs. 

A growing interest in the problems arising in connection with Bang abortion 
disease has been manifested by a steadily increasing number of inquiries con- 
cerning prevention, control, eradication, etc., which have been received by the 
office of the division from cattle owners, breeders, and dealers, and from public 
health officials. 

A two-day conference on Bang's disease, held at the Highland Hotel, Spring- 
field, May 26 and 27, was of interest to this division. Planned and arranged by 
a group of owners of purebred herds and others interested in the breeding and 
raising of cattle, the conference was attended by livestock officials, veterinarians, 
cattle owners, breeders, and others from all of the North Atlantic states. Speakers 
of both local and national repute addressed the assembly on problems pertaining 
to all phases of Bang's disease — area testing, disease control, vaccination, uni- 
form interstate regulations, effect on public health, etc. The conference was 
opened with an address of welcome by Hon. William Casey, Massachusetts 
Commissioner of Agriculture, and the closing address was given by Charles F. 
Riordan, director of this division. 

The United States Live Stock Sanitary Association, of which Massachusetts is 
a member, held its forty-first annual meeting in Chicago, Illinois, in December, 
1936. Practically all states in the Union are represented at the meetings of this 
association, at which matters of vital importance in the field of livestock disease 
control are discussed. The director of this division was in attendance at the meet- 
ing, and was later honored by an appointment to membership on the executive 
board of the association. 

On November 4, 1937, the Bureau of Animal Industry of the State of .New 
York, at a meeting held at the Ten Eyck Hotel, Albany, celebrated the achieve- 
ment of becoming a bovine tuberculosis-free modified accredited area — the forty- 
sixth state to be awarded this distinction. Massachusetts was represented by Dr. 
Harrie W. Peirce, chief veterinary health officer of this division, who was one of 
the speakers. 

TUBERCULOSIS 

The work of maintaining the standing of Massachusetts as a modified accredited 
bovine tuberculosis-free area through the elimination of tubercular animals from 
its dairy herds and the prevention of the spread of the disease continues to be 
one of the principal activities of the division. 

The need of constant vigilance on the part of herd owners and livestock disease 



P. D. 98 3 

officials is demonstrated by the occurrence of "breaks" in herds regarded as free 
from tuberculosis. "Breaks," i.e., the finding of reactors in comparatively large 
numbers in herds where there have been no reactors over a considerable period of 
time, usually occur in herds of two types; (1) herds in which an animal, exten- 
sively diseased but with no apparent symptoms of ill health, fails to react to the 
tuberculin test and, in many instances, is not detected until disposed of for beef 
purposes and slaughtered; (2) dairy herds in which there are constantly recurring 
changes through replacements which are made necessary in order to maintain the 
output of the dairy at a desired level. Breaks rarely occur in herds in which the 
owner raises his own animals. 

To guard against the recurrence of reactors and to insure against breaks, 
owners of herds should be impressed with the importance of giving careful atten- 
tion to proper sanitation of premises on which cattle are housed, thorough cleans- 
ing and disinfection of premises after the removal of diseased animals, the addi- 
tion of only such animals as can be identified as coming direct from tuberculosis- 
free herds, and the immediate removal or segregation of animals which display 
any symptoms of ill health. With officials of this division rests the responsibility 
of testing and retesting at specific intervals all cattle in the Commonwealth. 

The rating "modified accredited bovine tuberculosis-free area" applied to any 
state or section thereof implies that the incidence of bovine tuberculosis has been 
reduced to the low degree whereby not more than .5% of all cattle in the area so 
classified are reactors to the tuberculin test. Forty-six states now have achieved 
this rating. Of none of the states can it be said, however, that tuberculosis has 
been eradicated. State authorities in charge of the work of disease control are 
aware of the fact that only through continued vigilance can such a status be 
maintained. 

A total of 25,016 herd tests and 236,214 individual animal tests were made dur- 
ing the year, a decrease of 3.1% below the number of herd tests in the year 1936 
and 6.6% below the number of individual animal tests. Of the total, 1,234 herd 
tests and 3,793 animal tests were applied to herds or on premises where tests had 
not been conducted previously. In some instances the premises had been over- 
looked at time of previous tests in that area ; in others the owner had but recently 
acquired the premises or established the herd. (See Table: Tuberculin Testing 
by Months.) 

One thousand two hundred eighty (1,280) reactors were reported. These re- 
actors occurred in 519 herds containing a total of 15,096 cattle. The reactors 
represent .54% of the total number of animals tested. Although the percentage 
is lower than that of 1936, it is still slightly higher than the .5% stipulated by 
the federal government in the regulations governing the rating "modified ac- 
credited tuberculosis-free area." 

Three hundred five (305) of the 1,280 reactors, or 23.8% were reported at time 
of slaughter as "no lesion" cases, post-mortem examination failing to reveal 
lesions of tuberculosis. 

By totaling the number of cattle in the last test applied in each herd in each 
county, a fairly accurate estimate of the herd and cattle population of the state 
is obtained. By this method the number of herds (23,651) indicates a decrease 
of 2.5% below the number in 1936 (24,298), whereas the number of cattle 
(210,201) indicates an increase over that of 1936 (209,944). (See Table: County 
Population and Infection.) 

The percentage of reactors to the last test applied each year to all cattle in the 
state shows a gradual reduction in the incidence of this disease in the past three 
years; viz., 1935, .18% ; 1936, .12%; 1937, .08%. 

Tuberculin testing is conducted cooperatively with the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, by veterinarians employed or 
authorized by the Massachusetts Division of Livestock Disease Control and by 
veterinarians in the employ of the federal government. 









P. D. ! 


;cord of the 
Herds 


work for the year: 
Head Reactors 


No lesions 


6,819 


65,506 


392 


77 


13,781 


130,504 


671 


167 


44 


997 


2 


— 


4,372 


39,207 


215 


61 



Veterinarians paid by the 

state on an annual salary 

basis .... 
Veterinarians paid by the 

state on a per diem basis 
Veterinarians paid by the 

owners .... 
Veterinarians paid by the 

federal government 

25,016 236,214 1,280 305 

Tuberculin Testing of Goats 

During the year tuberculin tests were conducted in 7 separate herds to 60 goats, 
all of which were declared to be free from tuberculosis. 

Appraisal, Salvage and Indemnity 

The appraisal of reactor animals, the sale of them for beef purposes, and the 
method employed in computing indemnity for same are governed by law ( Chapter 
272, Acts of 1934) and by the rules and regulations made under authority of 
said law (Rules and Regulations Applying to the Tuberculin Testing of Cattle, 
approved by the Governor and Council, October 10, 1934). 

The laAv reads in part as follows: " The Commonwealth 

shall pay to the owner one-half of the dif- 
ference between the amount received by the owner for the carcass of the animal 
and the value of the animal as determined by appraisal ; pro- 
vided, that payment shall not exceed fifty dollars for any 

grade animal or seventy-five dollars for any purebred animal; " 

Appraisals: (Rules and regulations, Rule VII, section (b)). (A reactor) 

"shall be appraised at a fair and just estimate of its market value " 

(not as a diseased animal). 

Appraisals, for the most part, are made by the assistants on veterinary health 
of this division, who are qualified as official appraisers, in conjunction with the 
owners or their representatives. 

The average appraisal for the year (see Table: Appraisals) is $108.43. This 
amount represents an increase of $9.23, or approximately 10%, over the average 
appraisal for 1936. 

Salvage: (Rules and Regulations, Rule VII, section (c)). "The owner 

shall obtain not less than three signed bids and 

these bids must be submitted to the director for his approval " 

An owner is granted the right to consign his reactors to the beef market at 
Brighton to be sold by weight on a per pound basis, in which case the requirement 
for bids is waived. If sold in this manner, a reduction in the gross price received 
is allowed for expense of trucking (not to exceed $3. per animal), commission 
($1.), and yardage ($.35 per animal). The average net amount received for 
salvage this year is $37.47 (See Table : Salvage). This shows an increase of $2.31, 
or 6%, over last year ($35.16). 

Indemnity : The increase in the appraised value of reacting cattle, although 
accompanied by an increase in the amount received as salvage, resulted in an 
average per capita indemnity of $35.69, $3.29 more than the $32.40 paid in the 
year 1936. 

Federal indemnity for the same period averaged $22.79, an increase of $2.54 
over the average indemnity paid in 1936. 

By adding the state-paid indemnity ($35.69) ; federal indemnity ($22.79) ; and 
salvage ($37.47), the average total amount per head received by the owner of 
reacting animals is found to be $95.95. This amount represents an increase of 
$8.14 over the average amount received in 1936 ($87.81). 






r. i). 98 



TUBERCULIN TESTS BY MONTHS — 1937 





Clean 


With Reactors 


First 
























Tests 
















Total 






Total 




Herds 


P.B. 


Gd. 


Total 


Herds 


P.B. 


Gd. 


Tested 


P.B. 


Gd. 


Reacted 


1936 
























December . 


80 


5 


226 


231 


2 




8 


8 




2 


2 


1937 
























January. . . 


91 


5 


281 


286 


3 


6 


25 


31 




4 


4 


February. . 


132 


34 


370 


404 


3 


2 


36 


38 


1 


3 


4 


March .... 


104 


8 


371 


379 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




95 


4 


306 


310 


3 




15 


15 




3 


3 


May 


123 


10 


284 


294 


1 




34 


34 




2 


2 




163 


61 


414 


475 


4 




25 


25 




6 


6 


July 


126 


19 


387 


406 


6 




30 


30 




7 


7 


August. . . . 


94 


1 


177 


178 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


September 


60 


7 


226 


233 
















October . . . 


76 


27 


176 


203 


2 




5 


5 




2 


2 


November. 


63 


9 


193 


202 


1 




4 


4 




1 


1 


Total . . . 


1,207 


190 


3,411 


3,601 


27 


8 


184 


192 


1 


32 


33 



Retests 




1936 
























Decembei 


. 2,029 


2,448 


18,521 


20,969 


45 


114 


1,705 


1,819 


5 


94 


99 


1937 
























January. 


. 1,862 


2,378 


17,730 


20,108 


61 


114 


1,898 


2,012 


21 


136 


157 


February 


. 1,998 


3,156 


16,386 


19,542 


48 


136 


904 


1,040 


15 


73 


88 


March . . 


. 2,100 


2,327 


19,779 


22,106 


78 


189 


2,164 


2,353 


30 


135 


165 


April. . . . 


. 2,517 


4,846 


23,212 


28,058 


66 


319 


2,085 


2,404 


26 


139 


165 


May. . . . 


. 2,296 


2,752 


18,669 


21,421 


52 


90 


1,282 


1,372 


12 


186 


198 


June. . . . 


. 2,358 


1,084 


14,240 


15,324 


38 


22 


926 


948 


4 


91 


95 


July .... 


. 1,271 


777 


8,306 


9,083 


14 


36 


251 


287 


5 


30 


35 


August. . 


. 1,558 


654 


8,989 


9,643 


23 


37 


682 


719 


10 


48 


58 


Septembe 


r 1,097 


474 


8,314 


8,788 


15 


147 


331 


478 


9 


31 


40 


October . 


. 1,821 


1,440 


13,693 


15,133 


20 


140 


428 


568 


10 


47 


57 


Novembe 


r. 2,383 


3,026 


24,316 


27,342 


32 


203 


701 


904 


6 


84 


90 


Total . 


.23,290 


25,362 


192,155 


217,517 


492 


1,547 


13,357 


14,904 


153 


1,094 


1,247 





Tests , 


Reactors 


Total 


Herds 


P.B. 


Gd. 


Total 
Tested 


P.B. 


Gd. 


Total 
Reacted 



1936 

December . 
1937 

January. . 
February. 
March 
April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October. . 
November 

Total . . 



2,156 

2,017 
2,181 
2,283 
2,681 
2,472 
2,563 
1,417 
1,676 
1,172 
1,919 
2,479 



25,016 



2,567 

2,503 

3,328 

2,524 

5,169 

2,852 

1,167 

832 

692 

628 

1,607 

3,238 



27,107 



20,460 

19,934 

17,696 

22,315 

25,618 

20,269 

15,605 

8,974 

9,849 

8,871 

14,302 

25,214 



209,107 



23,027 

22,437 
21,024 
24,839 
30,787 
23,121 
16,772 

9,806 
10,541 

9,499 
15,909 
28,452 



236,214 



21 
16 
30 
26 
12 

4 

5 
10 

9 
10 

6 



154 



96 

140 

76 

136 

142 

188 

97 

37 

49 

31 

49 

85 



1,126 



101 

161 

92 

166 

168 

200 

101 

42 

59 

40 

59 

91 



1,280 



P. D. 98 



TUBERCULIN TESTS BY GOUNTIES — 1937 







Ci 


,EAN 




With Reactors 


First 




















Tests 
















Total 




Total 




Herds 


P.B. 


Gd. 


Total 


Herds 


P.B. 


Gd. 


Tested P.B. 


Gd. 


Reacted 


Counties 
























Barnstable. 


34 




44 


44 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


Berkshire . 


105 


10 


392 


402 
















Bristol .... 


114 


36 


292 


328 


3 


6 


23 


29 




4 


4 


Dukes .... 


9 


2 


14 


16 
















Essex 


107 


7 


243 


250 


3 




7 


7 




3 


3 


Franklin . . 


68 


2 


223 


225 
















Hampden . 


99 


5 


269 


274 


3 




23 


23 




3 


3 


Hampshire 


75 


6 


230 


236 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


Middlesex . 


187 


15 


456 


471 


8 


1 


59 


60 


1 


9 


10 


Nantucket 


1 




1 


1 
















Norfolk . . . 


69 


31 


117 


148 


3 


1 


53 


54 




5 


5 


Plymouth 


92 


11 


214 


225 


1 




2 


2 




1 


1 


Suffolk 


5 




15 


15 
















Worcester . 


242 


65 


901 


966 


4 




15 


15 




5 5 


Total . . . 


1,207 


190 


3,411 


3,601 


27 


8 


184 


192 


1 


32 


33 



Retests : 




Barnstable. 


531 


98 


1,646 


1,744 


2 




111 


111 




3 


3 


Berkshire . 


2,252 


4,021 


24,977 


28,998 


31 


109 


963 


1,072 


8 


59 


67 


Bristol .... 


2,534 


2,614 


18,516 


21,130 


75 


101 


1,733 


1,834 


7 


122 


129 


Dukes .... 


130 


16 


663 


679 


















1,587 


1.996 


12,068 


14,064 


60 


176 


2,312 


2,488 


19 


102 


121 


Franklin . . 


2,084 


2,593 


19,822 


22,415 


5 


1 


98 


99 




12 


12 


Hampden . 


1,937 


1,444 


13,233 


14,677 


14 


190 


310 


500 


15 


21 


36 


Hampshire 


2,123 


2,888 


16,548 


19,436 


45 


526 


782 


1,308 


20 


70 


90 


Middlesex . 


2,567 


2,508 


21,955 


24,463 


83 


62 


2,368 


2,430 


18 


286 


304 


Nantucket 


44 


16 


435 


451 
















Norfolk . . . 


1,060 


1,121 


7,826 


8,947 


26 


36 


795 


831 


7 


85 


92 


Plymouth 


1,619 


1,224 


10,262 


11,486 


21 


40 


636 


676 


2 


54 


56 


Suffolk. . . . 


19 


81 


93 


174 
















Worcester . 


4,803 


4,742 


44,111 


48,853 


130 


306 


3,249 


3,555 


57 


280 


337 


Total . . . 


23,290 


25,362 


192,155 


217,517 


492 


1,547 


13,357 


14,904 


153 


1,094 


1,247 







Tests 






Reactors 




Total 






















Total 






Total 




Herds 


P.B. 


Gd. 


Tested 


P.B. 


Gd. 


Reacted 




568 


98 


1,802 


1,900 




4 


4 




2,388 


4,140 


26,332 


30,472 


8 


59 


67 




2,726 


2,757 


20,564 


23,321 


7 


126 


133 


Dukes 


139 


18 


677 


695 










1,757 


2,179 


14,630 


16,809 


19 


105 


124 


Franklin 


2,157 


2,596 


20,143 


22,739 




12 


12 


Hampden 


2,053 


1,639 


13,835 


15,474 


15 


24 


39 


Hampshire 


2,244 


3,420 


17,561 


20,981 


20 


71 


91 


Middlesex 


2,845 


2,586 


24,838 


27,424 


19 


295 


314 


Nantucket 


45 


16 


436 


452 








Norfolk 


1,158 


1,189 


8,791 


9,980 


7 


90 


97 


Plymouth 


1,733 


1,275 


11,114 


12,389 


2 


55 


57 


Suffolk 


24 


81 


108 


189 










5,179 


5,113 


48,276 


53,389 


57 


285 


342 


Total 


25,016 


27,107 


209,107 


236,214 


154 


1,126 


1,280 



P. D. 98 



COUNTY INFECTION 
STATUS OF HERDS ON NOVEMBER 30 — 1935.1936,1937 



1935 


TESTS 


REACTORS 






Herds 


Head 


Herds 


Head 


Reactors 




621 


2.109 


3 


24 


3 




2.251 


25.921 


10 


341 


20 




2.734 


19,009 


26 


286 


38 




155 


777 


— 


— 


— 




1.703 


13.289 


17 


765 


28 




2.197 


20.875 


4 


51 


4 




2.054 


14.684 


13 


247 


40 




2.281 


19.186 


19 


348 


24 




2.690 


22.110 


41 


789 


91 




45 


447 


1 


1 


1 


Norfolk 


1,131 


8.866 


8 


224 


27 




1.785 


10.126 


15 


343 


27 


Suffolk 


21 


181 


2 


17 


2 




5.306 


48,983 


43 


813 


84 




24.974 


206,563 


202 


4.249 


389 



1936 


TESTS 


REACTORS 




Herds 


Head 


Herds 


Head 


Reactors 




617 


1.999 








__ 




2,243 


26.461 


22 


430 


39 


Bristol 


2.675 


19,817 


13 


246 


15 




147 


707 


1 


2 


1 




1.643 


13,869 


9 


722 


29 




2,136 


20,573 


2 


63 


25 




1.998 


14.866 


4 


140 


6 


Ilaui^.^hi. ^ . 


2.221 


19.585 


6 


220 


9 




2,656 


22.509 


in 


zyy 


17 




47 


481 


— 


— 


— 


Norfolk 


1.105 


8.951 


1 


33 


20 




1.673 


10.355 


3 


143 


5 


Suffolk 


20 


189 


— 


— 


— 




5.117 


49.582 


34 


786 


94 


Total 


24.298 


209,944 


105 


3,084 


260 



1937 


TESTS 


REACTORS 




Herds 


Head 


Herds 


Head 


Reactors 




572 


1,909 


__ 









2.153 


26.194 


3 


64 


9 




2.590 


20.454 


9 


163 


12 




143 


703 


— 


— 







1,614 


13.924 


11 


848 


28 




2,050 


20.590 


— 


— 







1,958 


14,866 


4 


102 


14 




2.152 


19,633 


4 


149 


7 




2.645 


23.054 


8 


151 


39 




45 


452 


— 


— 





Norfolk 


1.079 


8.842 


1 


141 


4 




1.620 


10.453 


4 


88 


23 


Suffolk 


22 


176 


— 


— 


— 




5.008 


48.951 


25 


549 


41 




23.651 


210.201 


69 


2.255 


177 



P. D. 98 



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1936 

December 

1937 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November . 





10 



P. D. 98 



INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF CATTLE INTO MASSACHUSETTS 

The movement or transportation of cattle into the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts is governed by certain restrictions set forth by law ( Chapter 495, Acts of 
1924) and by rules and regulations made under authorization of the law (Orders 
42 and 43), by which jurisdiction is given the Division of Livestock Disease Con- 
trol over the movement and disposition of cattle after arrival within the Com- 
monwealth. 

These interstate shipments may be considered as of two classes; viz., (1) cattle 
intended for dairy, exhibition, and breeding purposes; and (2) cattle intended 
for immediate slaughter: and, under the rules and regulations applying to ship- 
ments, may be subdivided as follows; (a) cattle shipped direct to the quarantine 
station at Brighton, which shipments may be made without a permit; and (b) 
cattle shipped to points other than Brighton, which shipments, with the exception 
of cattle consigned for immediate slaughter to establishments where slaughtering 
is conducted under federal inspection, must be accompanied by a permit issued 
through the office of this division. 

In both groups, cattle intended for any purpose other than immediate slaughter 
also must be accompanied by a certificate from the livestock department of the 
state of origin indicating that the animal or animals included in the shipment 
have satisfactorily passed a tuberculin test and are free from all symptoms of 
communicable disease. 

It also is required that such cattle be held in quarantine at point of delivery 
until properly identified and released. The following tabulations are a record of 
the cattle received interstate this year. 

Quarantine Station at Brighton 

The receipts at the dairy section of the quarantine station, indicating the origin 
and disposition of cattle received are as follows : 
Interstate : 
Origin: 
Interstate : 

Canada . 

Connecticut 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

New York 

Rhode Island . 

Vermont 



Released 


Held for Retest 




on Papers 


and Released 


Total 


129 


— 


129 


34 


— 


34 


4,707 


— 


4,707 


1,939 


18 


1,957 


156 


1 


157 


24 


— 


24 


1,969 


39 


2,008 



Massachusetts 



8,958 
2,324 



58 
4 



9,016 
2,328 



Disposition : 

Connecticut 

Massachusetts 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Rhode Island 

Vermont 

Held for retest 

9,016 2,328 11,344 

There were also received at this station, 616 reactors to tuberculin tests, 31 
Bang abortion disease reactors, 4 animals affected with actinomycosis, 3 with 
mastitis, and 9 suspects of various other diseases. 

Five hundred twenty-six (526) trucks and 2 railroad cars were cleaned and 
disinfected under direct supervision of an employee of this division. 



11,282 


62 


11,344 


Interstate 


state 


Total 


11 


— 


11 


7,311 


2,149 


9,460 


1 


— 


1 


5 


2 


7 


1,683 


177 


1,860 


3 


— 


6 


2 


— 


2 



P. D. 98 11 

Treatment of cattle by agents of this division for the prevention of hemorrhagic 
septicemia, or shipping fever, has been continued at the station for such owners 
of cattle as request this type of service. A total of 3,170 head of cattle were 
treated. 

Arrivals at Points Other Than Brighton 

Four thousand one hundred ninety-eight (4,198) permits, required under 
Order 43 mentioned above, were issued in 1937, as compared with 4,035 in 1936. 
Of this number, 196 permits covered shipments for exhibition purposes. 

On these permits there were received 20,120 dairy cattle, 762 exhibition cattle, 
and 2,811 cattle for immediate slaughter. The dairy cattle originated at the 
following points : 

California 1 New Jersey 12 

Canada 2,180 New York 1,446 

Connecticut 1,857 Ohio 1,097 

Illinois 28 Pennsylvania 436 

Kansas 4 Rhode Island 791 

Maine 931 Vermont 7,075 

Maryland 2 Virginia 3 

Michigan 154 Washington 1 

Minnesota 73 Wisconsin 624 

New Hampshire 3,405 

Total 20,120 

Of this number, 19,661 were released on certificates of health furnished by the 
state of origin ; 459 were held, retested, and released. 

Recapitulation 

The total number of dairy cattle received interstate was 29,136 (9,016 at Brigh- 
ton and 20,120 at other points). 

The following table is an analysis of the section from which cattle were re- 
ceived interstate: 

Canada 2,309 

Western states 1,982 

5 New England states 22,789 

New York 1,603 

Southern states 452 



29,136 



CATTLE EXPORTS 

During 1937, 1,882 head of cattle identified and released at the dairy section 
of the Brighton quarantine station were transported direct to other states. In 
addition 3,089 interstate shipping certificates were issued by the division cover- 
ing 6,271 head of Massachusetts cattle for consignment to other states and coun- 
tries. 

The following tabulation is a record of cattle exports : 

From the quarantine station at Brighton: 

Destination: Head 

Connecticut 11 Rhode Island 1,860 

Maine 1 Vermont 3 

New Hampshire 7 

1,882 



12 P. D. 98 

From Massachusetts herds: 

Destination: Head Destination: Head 

California 30 New Jersey 14 

Colorado 1 New York 513 

Connecticut 2,017 North Carolina 2 

Delaware 3 Ohio 22 

Florida 3 Oklahoma 2 

Georgia 3 Oregon 1 

Idaho 2 Pennsylvania 63 

Illinois 18 Rhode Island 2,034 

Indiana 28 South Carolina 2 

Iowa 1 Tennessee 2 

Kansas 17 Vermont 471 

Louisiana 1 Virginia 10 

Maine 46 West Virginia 9 

Maryland 6 Wisconsin 11 

Michigan 28 

Minnesota 2 Total 6,267 

Missouri 3 Canada 4 

New Hampshire 902 

Total 6,271 

LICENSED CATTLE DEALERS 

A total of 279 cattle dealers' licenses were issued during the year to persons 
engaged in the business of dealing in bovine animals. Three (3) licenses were 
temporarily suspended and 4 were revoked for failure on the part of the holder 
of the license to report purchases and sales of cattle. One revoked license was 
renewed upon payment of the five-dollar renewal fee required by law after the 
dealer had submitted to this office all overdue reports and had made a satisfactory 
explanation concerning his failure to comply with the regulations. 

The "dealer" license law (Chapter 426, Acts of 1935) applies to all persons 
in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts who purchase, raise, or in any way acquire 
cattle for the purpose of making a profit through the sale or exchange of said 
cattle for any purpose other than immediate slaughter. The law does not apply to 
persons who buy, sell, or exchange cattle in the course of maintaining the normal 
dairy status of a herd. 

The occasional finding in dealers' herds of reactors to the tuberculin test and 
the frequent finding of cattle intended for sale into dairy herds of the state which 
do not comply with department regulations regarding additions to tuberculosis- 
free supervised herds remove any doubt as to the necessity and the value of the 
law. 

Dealers are required to report each week on forms furnished for that purpose 
all cattle purchased, repossessed, or in any way obtained by them, and also such 
cattle as are sold or otherwise disposed of, giving information as to the identifica- 
tion, name and address of the person from whom obtained, or to whom sold or 
delivered. A weekly report is required even though no transactions have taken 
place. Failure to comply with this requirement is considered just cause for the 
revocation of a license. Weekly reports submitted by cattle dealers in 1937 
record a total of 33,738 head of cattle sold by them during the year, 31,360 were 
sold as dairy cattle and 2,378 for beef purposes. 

The checking of information contained in these weekly reports sometimes re- 
veals the purchase of animals from premises where tuberculin testing has not been 
conducted under state supervision; the purchase or sale of grade cattle having 
no ear tag by which they can be identified; and the purchase or sale of cattle 
which have not been tuberculin tested within a year, as required by department 
regulation. Dealers, with the exception of very few, however, are to be com- 
mended for the manner in which they have cooperated with the division. 

Convictions were obtained in district court against two persons — one from 
Reading and one from Newburyport — for dealing in cattle without a license. 



P. D. 98 13 

Both dealers entered an appeal and their cases were carried to superior court. In 
the case of the Reading dealer, the superior court upheld the decision of the local 
court and a fine of $50. was paid. The case of the Newburyport dealer is still 
awaiting action by the superior court. 

BANG BACILLUS DISEASE 

Evidence is available to show that as early as 1884 abortion in cattle was recog- 
nized as of grave economic importance to dairy owners, and that even then it was 
considered of importance from the point of view of public health. On May 13, 
1884, just fifty years before the federal government adopted its so-called elimina- 
tion plan with eventual eradication in view, the Massachusetts legislature passed 
a law (Chapter 232, Acts of 1884) which reads in part as follows: 

It shall be the duty of the cattle commissioners to make inquiries and 
gather facts and statistics in relation to the prevalence among neat 
stock of the State, of the disease known as abortion, the annual losses 
caused thereby, and its effect on the healthfulness of milk as an article 

of food to ascertain the real character of the disease, 

its cause or prevention 

The sum of $2,000 was appropriated for the purpose of carrying out the pro- 
visions of the law. 

The attempt to obtain data regarding the prevalence of the disease was unsuc- 
cessful. According to the report of the commission, few if any replies were re- 
ceived to questionnaires sent to dairy organizations, breeders, and owners of 
cattle. This apparent reticence on the part of cattle owners to admit the fact that 
abortion does occur to any extent evidently still exists. An unsatisfactory re- 
sponse given to inquiries made again two years ago might lead to the erroneous 
conclusion that the act of abortion rarely occurs. 

The importance of some definite plan to combat abortion in cattle, now known 
ne Bang abortion disease, has been brought to the attention of all persons and 
agencies interested in the livestock industry. Every state now has regulations 
relative to this disease, varying from restrictions on interstate movement to com- 
pulsory reporting of diseased animals, quarantining, tagging, branding, and 
slaughtering. Thirty-six states now require a negative blood test on imported 
cattle made within a period varying from fifteen to sixty days prior to date of 
shipment. Others, including Massachusetts, forbid the shipment into the state of 
cattle that have reacted to the blood test or that have aborted within one year of 
date of shipment. 

Although it is generally agreed that, if eradication is to be the ultimate goal, 
the blood test is imperative; it has also been established that the act of abortion 
can be prevented and the disease controlled by preventive vaccination, and that, 
from an economic view, possibly the latter course is the one to adopt, especially 
in herds the owners of which are interested principally in milk production. 

Experiments in calf hood- vaccination (the vaccination of calves between the 
ages of four and seven months) and the experience of veterinarians engaged in 
private practice along that line, lead some authorities to believe that in this man- 
ner herds eventually may be freed from the disease. Other authorities, however, 
advocate both methods — vaccination and blood testing. Whichever course is 
adopted, the fact remains that, thus far, blood testing is the only means by which 
the disease can be diagnosed correctly. 

There has been no change since last year in the service offered by this division. 
Vials for use in obtaining blood samples and laboratory service are furnished 
without cost to any person making application for them. Eighteen thousand 
forty-seven (18,047) blood samples were examined during the year. Of this 
number, 14,364 were reported by the laboratory as negative to the agglutination 
test and 920 positive to titres of 1-100 or higher. These samples were submitted 
from 412 herds. Ninety-nine (99) of these herds have now passed at least one 
clean test. Thirty-four (34) of the herds containing 1,254 head of cattle six 
months of age or over, accredited in 1936, were re-accredited ; 12 herds containing 
593 head were accredited for the first time in 1937 ; 1 herd containing 216 head, 



14 P. D. 98 

newly accredited in 1937, lost its accreditation status during the year; at the 
close of the year there were 45 herds containing 1,631 head accredited. 

Testing for Bang abortion disease by the U. S. Bureau of Animal Industry 
under the federal elimination plan has continued throughout the year. Under 
this plan veterinarians are assigned by the federal office to obtain blood samples 
from all animals in the herd six months of age or over. Cattle which react to the 
blood test are tagged and branded and must be disposed of by slaughter. Com- 
pensation (limited to $25. for a grade animal and $50. for a purebred) is allowed. 
In addition, the amount received for salvage is retained by the owner. Under 
the federal plan, 5,986 bloods were drawn during the year from 73 herds by 
veterinarians in the government employ. Two hundred twenty-nine (229) re- 
actors were found. 

RABIES 

In a report of the Massachusetts Board of Cattle Commissioners pertaining to 
contagious diseases of animals, printed in the year 1890, appears this statement 
referring specifically to rabies : "Public welfare requires that an effort be made 
to restrict the movement of ownerless, neglected, or suspicious dogs." It hardly 
can be considered to the credit of officials responsible for the enforcement of laws 
relative to the licensing of dogs that this statement is equally true today. 

Four years later, in 1894, the General Court of Massachusetts amended the law 
defining contagious diseases of animals so as to include rabies ( Chapter 491, Acts 
of 1894). 

During the years following, rabies has continued to be a potential menace to 
public health. It is conceded by most authorities not only that the spread of the 
disease can be controlled, but that the disease itself can be prevented, and, further, 
that it could be eradicated eventually if all persons who should be concerned in 
its control would cooperate to the fullest extent; i.e., (1) police officers, dog 
officers, and others, by an all-the-year-round enforcement of the existing dog 
laws, especially those relative to the destruction of unlicenesd dogs, including 
those dogs harbored but not licensed, and so-called "strays"; (2) dog-owners, by 
the strict observance of quarantine on individual animals or in districts where 
restraint is ordered; (3) veterinarians and all other persons, by reporting 
promptly suspects or affected animals; (4) inspectors of animals, by rounding 
up and quarantining all possible contact animals; and, possibly, (5) local boards 
of health, by establishing preventive or immunization treatment clinics, espec- 
ially in districts in which cases of rabies actually occur. 

From the following tables it will be noted that the number of animals reported 
as affected with rabies took a decided upward trend during the year — a total of 
218 cases, as compared with 134 in 1936, or an increase of 60%. These cases 
occurred in 76 cities and towns located in 8 counties : viz., Bristol, 3 towns, 5 
cases; Essex, 19 towns, 77 cases; Franklin, 1 town, 1 case; Middlesex, 26 towns, 
76 cases ; Norfolk, 10 towns, 23 cases ; Plymouth, 1 town, 1 case ; Suffolk, 4 towns, 
7 cases; and Worcester, 12 towns, 28 cases. 

There were no cases reported in ten of the towns that in 1936 reported positive 
cases of rabies. One hundred twelve (112) or 51% of the total number of cases 
reported, were in 31 of the towns in which rabies was reported in 1936 ; 106 cases, 
or 49% of the total number, were located in 41 cities and town in which there 
were no cases reported in 1936. Nineteen (19) of the rabid dogs were classed as 
"strays"; i.e., owners unknown — a fact which reflects laxity on the part of city 
and town officials. As far as licensing of dogs is concerned, in only 7 of the total 
number of cases of rabid animals reported could the identity of the animal from 
which the disease was contracted be determined. (See Table: Rabies, contact 
cases.) 

Regardless of the circumstances surrounding the cause of death, it is required, 
as a measure of safety, that the heads of animals that have inflicted injuries by 
biting or scratching persons and have then died or been killed, be sent to the 
laboratory for this division for examination. During the year 463 heads were 
received for laboratory examination. Of this number, 174 were reported by the 



P. D. 98 



15 



laboratory as positive, or affected with rabies; 9 doubtful — usually due to con- 
tamination or in such condition as to make examination unsatisfactory ; and 280 
negative, or not affected with rabies. 

One hundred-sixty -one (161) persons were reported this year as having been 
bitten or scratched by rabid animals, and 297 persons as having been exposed or 
in contact with rabid animals. 

Although the Pasteur treatment to humans can assure reasonable protection 
against rabies, from a public health point of view there seems to be no excuse 
for a continued existence of this disease. Deaths, however, occur occasionally re- 
gardless of treatment. Fortunately, despite the increase of rabies in animals, 
there was no case in man reported this year. This is due undoubtedly in part to 
the fact that an injury inflicted by the bite or scratch of an animal, regardless of 
whether due to viciousness, accident, or play, is considered a reportable disease 
in Massachusetts and, accordingly, physicians are required to report to the board 
of health all treatments to persons for such injuries. This insures early adminis- 
tration of antirabic treatment when the injury is inflicted by an animal suspected 
of having rabies. 

The number of animal-bite cases reported this year is 8,355, as compared with 
7,863 reported in 1936. All reported animal-bite cases are referred to the inspec- 
tor of animals of the city or town in which the animal causing the injury is owned 
or kept, and are investigated by him. Animals inflicting such injury are ordered 
restrained for a period of ten to fourteen days for observation. They are then 
released if apparently in good health. 

During the year dog- vaccination clinics were held under the supervision of 
local boards of health in 45 cities and towns, at which 13,498 of the 28,321 dogs 
licensed were treated. There is no uniform plan under which these clinics are 
operated; some communities furnish the service without cost to the dog owner, 
other communities make a nominal charge for the treatment. Regardless of 
whether a charge is made, however, it is quite apparent that the public as a whole 
is not much interested in the problem of rabies prevention (only 47% of tke dogs 
licensed were presented for treatment). Nor can it be said that the law requiring 
the licensing of dogs is enforced properly (only 53% of the estimated 37,465 
dogs in 37 communities were recorded as licensed). Sixty-three (63) cases of 
rabies were reported from 24 of the communities where clinics were held. 

Preventive vaccination of dogs, like antirabic treatment, is not regarded as 
wholly efficient, yet it is considered as nearly perfect as any vaccination known to 
medical science and, if carried out properly, will reduce the number of cases of 
rabies to such an extent that it will aid immeasurably in eventual eradication. 



Acton 1 

Andover 2 

Arlington 5 

Ashland 1 

Athol 4 

Attleboro 3 

Ayer 1 

Belmont 2 

Billerica 4 

Bolton 1 

Boston 2 

Brookline 2 

Burlington 2 

Cambridge 8 

Chelsea 1 

Chelmsford 1 

Danvers 3 

Douglas 1 

Dover 2 



1937 — RABIES 

Dracut 

Everett 

Foxborough 

Franklin 

Gardner 

Greenfield 

Groveland 

Haverhill 

Holbrook 

Holden 

Tnswich 

Lawrence 

Lexington 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Lynnfield 

Maiden 

Mansfield 

Marblehead 



BY TOWNS — DOGS 

1 Medford 9 

3 Medfield 2 

2 Methuen 16 

1 Middleton 2 

1 Millis 1 

1 Nahant 2 

1 Newton 5 

2 North Andover 3 

2 Northborough 2 

3 Norwood 5 



Peabody 

Pembroke 

Princeton 

Phillipston 

Reading 

Revere 

Rowley 1 

Salem 10 

Saugus .... 2 



Somerville 1 

Stoughton 1 

Swampscott 3 

Uxbridge 1 

Taunton 1 

Templeton 5 

Tewksbury 4 

Topsfield 1 

Tyngsborough 2 

Walpole 5 

Waltham 5 

Watertown 2 

Weston 1 

Wilmington 1 

Winchester 2 

Winthrop 2 

Woburn 3 

Worcester 1 



1937 — RABIES BY TOWNS 



Andover 

Arlington 

Douglas 

Lawrence 

Peabody 

Spencer 

Templeton 

Topsfield 



MISCELLANEOUS 
Cats Cattle 



Fox 



Horse Ponv 
1 — 



16 



P. D. 98 



RABIES 



Forward, Year 1936 

December. 1936 

January, 1937 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Forward . 



Total 



The above record refers to 
the following animals: 

Cats 

Horses 

Pony 

Dogs 

Fox 

Monkeys 

Racoon 

Fitch 

Parrot 

Rats 

Cattle 

Squirrels 

Goats 

Mouse 

Rabbits 

Woodchuck .... 



Showing 
Symptoms 



0U £ 



19 
27 
12 
16 
17 



14 4 
17 7 
24 2 
23 8 
19 2 

15 10 



5 1 
- 1 



> •- .a 



9 

o 



211 58 17 



3 4 1 

1 — — 

1 — — 

200 52 16 

1 — — 



Contact 



•3 B 



— o 



rt.S 

[2 Q 



11 

21 
3 
56 
22 
41 
5 
43 
19 
4 
23 
15 



263 20 



23 



23 



227 20 



23 



29 



1 — 



2i 



157 
360 
375 
451 
534 
679 
1027 
920 
987 
867 
727 
520 
460 



Bite Cases 






Jbt OS 



47 — 
2 — 



8002 



7 
14 
15 
14 
23 
28 
25 
19 
19 
24 
13 
13 



— — — 186 



8064 43 219 186 



13 — 



43 198 186 



2 — 



2 — 



1 — 

2 — 
1 — 



168 

411 

420 

556 

610 

76-5 

1096 

1022 

1071 

914 

804 

573 

489 

209 



9111 



73 
3 
1 
8973 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
3 

36 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 



Total positive cases, 218 



HOG CHOLERA 

The service furnished by this division in the treatment of swine in prevention 
of disease, which is given without charge, continues to be, next to the work of 
bovine tuberculosis eradication, the most important of the many projects con- 
ducted by the division. Intended originally to apply to prevention of hog cholera, 
this service has gradually expanded to include both prophylactic and corrective 
treatments of the many diseases of a contagious nature to which swine are subject. 

That hog cholera as a disease can be prevented and, even if infection occurs, 
the spread of this disease, if uncomplicated, can be controlled, are now generally 
accepted by persons engaged in the raising of swine. These facts can not be 
claimed, however, for the many other diseases of swine of a contagious or infec- 
tious nature. These disease conditions often can be traced to unsanitary premises, 
bad housing conditions, improper feeding, etc., all of which tend to break down 
the natural resistance of animals to disease and render the body a fertile field for 
invasion by disease. Owners unfamiliar with the problems involved oftentimes 
are inclined to question the value of preventive hog cholera treatment, or to feel 
that vaccination is at fault. Too little attention is given to the fact that contagious 
diseases are often conveyed from one location to another by persons, by vehicles, 
and by animals which have been in contact with diseased animals or contaminated 
premises. A strict quarantine should be imposed against these agencies. Such a 
quarantine, with particular attention given to sanitation, disinfection, dry 



P. D. 98 17 

quarters, an abundant supply of good drinking water, and balanced feeding 
should result in financial benefit to swine owners. 

During the past year losses, as far as hog cholera itself is concerned, have 
been comparatively small ; but, in comparison, the losses from conditions variously 
diagnosed as hemorrhagic septicemia, enteritis, swine influenza, and so-called 
mixed-infection have been unusually heavy. During the year 86,625 treatments 
for and in the prevention of hog cholera were applied by veterinarians in the 
employ of this division on 883 premises. In addition, 38,227 treatments, which by 
law must be reported, were applied on 211 premises by veterinarians engaged in 
private practice. 

In connection with other infections in swine, 35,389 treatments were applied 
by state-employed veterinarians and 9,153 treatments by veterinarians in private 
practice. 

MISCELLANEOUS DISEASES 

Actinomycosis. — (Commonly called "lump jaw.') Ten (10) animals suspected 
of having this disease were reported during the year. Upon examination, all 
were declared affected with the disease and were condemned and disposed of by 
slaughter. 

Anthrax. — No positive case of anthrax occurred during the year. Although 8 
head of cattle and 2 horses were quarantined under suspicion of having this 
disease, they were later released. 

Blackleg. — Preventive treatment was applied to 1,648 head of cattle on 161 
premises located in 52 towns. This service is rendered without charge upon the 
request of owners of young cattle in districts where pastures infected with the 
disease are located. 

Glanders. — No case of glanders occurred in Massachusetts during the year. 
Nine (9) horses were reported on suspicion of having the disease but were later 
released after physical examination was made of two of the horses and laboratory 
examination was made of blood samples taken from the remaining seven horses. 

Mange — This condition was reported in 21 head of cattle on 4 premises. 

Avian tuberculosis — Laboratory examination of several birds in one flock con- 
firmed a diagnosis of avian tuberculosis. The entire flock was disposed of by 
killing. Although avian tuberculosis is reported to be prevalent in many Western 
states, that condition in Massachusetts is rarely reported to this division. When 
found in this state, the disease generally occurs in old birds. The further spread 
of infection is usually prevented by killing the old birds in the flock and by care- 
fully disinfecting the premises. 

ANNUAL INSPECTION OF NEAT CATTLE, SHEEP AND SWINE 

In accordance with Chapter 129, section 19, of the General Laws, the annual 
inspection of neat cattle, sheep, and swine, and of the premises where kept was 
ordered on November 15, 1936, to be completed on or before January 1, 1937. 

From reports received from the 355 cities and towns in the Commonwealth, 
inspections were made of 23,612 premises, on which were located 212,437 head 
of cattle, 7,838 sheep, 87,624 head of swine, and 2,181 goats. Of the total number 
of cattle reported, 148,117 were listed as dairy cows ; 2,667 bulls and 17,924 cows 
were recorded as purebreds. 

Regional meetings of inspectors of animals were held in the month of November 
at Boston, Greenfield, Pittsfield, Springfield, and Worcester, for the purpose of 
giving information and instruction relative to the duties of the inspectors of 
animals. 



18 P. D. 98 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation for the salary of the Director, Chapter 

234, Acts of 1937 $4,000.00 

Expended during the year for the salary of the Director $4,000.00 

Appropriation for personal services of clerks and sten- 
ographers, Chapter 234, Acts of 1937 $26,600.00 

Expended during the year for personal services of clerks 

and stenographers $26,380.36 

Unexpended balance 219.64 



Appropriation for services other than personal, includ- 
ing printing the annual report, traveling expenses 
of the Director, office supplies and equipment and 
rent, Chapter 234, Acts of 1937 $10,500.00 

Brought forward from 1936 Appropriation 148.84 



$26,600.00 



Total amount appropriated $10,648.84 

Expended during the year for the above mentioned pur- 
poses $9,659.21 

Unexpended balance 989.63 

$10,648.84 



Appropriation for personal services of veterinarians 
and agents engaged in the work of extermination of 
contagious diseases among domestic animals, Chap- 
ter 234, Acts of 1937 $73,000.00 

Brought forward from 1936 Appropriation 5.75 

Total amount appropriated $73,005.75 

Expended during the year for the following purposes : 

Services of salaried agents $37,618.00 

Services of per diem agents 31,122.25 

Labor hired 1,830.12 



Total expenditure $70,570.37 

Unexpended balance 2,435.38 



$73,005.75 



Appropriation for traveling expenses of veterinarians 
and agents, including the cost of anv motor vehicles 
purchased for their use, Chapter 234, Acts of 1937 $21,000.00 

Brought forward from 1936 Appropriation 192.64 

Total amount appropriated $21,192.64 

Expended during the year for traveling expenses of 

agents $19,366.92 

Unexpended balance 1,825.72 

$21,192.64 

Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of horses 

killed during the present and previous years ; travel, 
when allowed, of inspectors of animals, incidental 
expenses of killing and burial, quarantine and emer- 
gency services and for laboratory and veterinary 
supplies and equipment, Chapter 234, Acts of 1937 $4,800.00 

Brought forward from 1936 Appropriation 21.86 

Transferred from Extraordinary Expenses 75.00 

Total amount appropriated $4,896.86 

Expended during the year for the above mentioned pur- 
poses $4,808.90 

Unexpended balance 87,96 

$4,896.86 



P. D. 98 19 

Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of tuber- 
cular cattle killed, as authorized by Section twelve 
A of Chapter 129 of the General Laws, as appear- 
ing in the Tercentenary Edition thereof, and in ac- 
cordance with certain provisions of law and agree- 
ments made under authority of Section 33 of said 
chapter 129, as amended, during the present and 
the previous year. Chapter 234, Acts of 1937 $31,400.00 

Brought forward from 1936 Appropriation 15,972.71 



Total amount appropriated $47,372.71 

Expended during the year for the following : 1,272 head 
of cattle killed (Chapter 129, General Laws, as 
amended) $45,488.72 

Unexpended balance 1,883.99 

$47,372.71 

.Reimbursement to towns for inspectors of animals: 

Appropriation for the reimbursement of certain 
towns for compensation paid to inspectors of ani- 
mals, Chapter 234, Acts of 1937 $5,200.00 

Brought forward from 1936 Appropriation 3.50 



Total amount appropriated $5,203.50 

Expended during the year for reimbursement of certain 

towns $4,982.88 

Unexpended balance 220.62 

$5,203.50 



The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions of Chap- 
ter 129, General Laws, as amended, was $58.21 for registered purebred cattle and 
$32.72 for grade cattle. 

There has been received during the year for Hemorrhagic Septicemia treat- 
ments at Brighton, $475.50; and for Cattle Dealers' licenses, in accordance with 
Chapter 426, Acts of 1935, $1,375.00. 

Financial statement verified. 

Approved. 

Geo. E. Murphy, 

Comptroller. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles F. Riordan, 

Director. 




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